Clivia miniata: How to grow from seed?

Badener's picture

My clivia produces seeds regularly (in pods that ripen to red).  How, exactly, do I grow clivia from seed?

Southern Ontario, Z5B
willem's picture

(post #15437, reply #1 of 19)

Hang on,


Method 1: when the red seed skin starts bursting open they are ready. Let them lay on the soil and nature will take over.


Method 2: In the seed pot you will find 1 or 2 seeds, peel back the red seed skin (must already be open) place the seeds seperately in pots. Wait for nature.     Keep in mind they grow slowly.


Method 3: take runners from the base plant.  This grows faster.


Method 4: risky, take clippings from the leaves.


sorry Dutch site http://www.neerlandstuin.nl/plantenb/clivia.html if any questions ask.


LOL 



Willem the Hollander,


Gardening 18ft below sealevel (Much better)                                                              


Edited 1/16/2004 8:24:51 AM ET by Willem the Hollander


Edited 1/16/2004 8:31:30 AM ET by Willem the Hollander

Willem the Hollander,

Gardening 18ft below sealevel (Much better)                                                              

Badener's picture

(post #15437, reply #2 of 19)

Thanks for  mentioning the Clivia's seed pods should burst open.   I probably harvested my seeds  unripe (pod red, but firmly closed). I'll wait longer next time.  Hope your laissez-faire approach works.  I'll report my success/failure in a few years, in this Forum.


Because it's very cold in the winter  in Ontario (minus 25 degrees Celsius at night, at the moment), Clivias must spend more than half of the year indoors.  (But our  hot summers are great for tomatoes, eggplants, melons, peppers - surely better than Hollland?)

Southern Ontario, Z5B
ElizabethAWI's picture

(post #15437, reply #3 of 19)

I don't know where Jeana is these days, but I know she's had Clivia seedlings. Hopefully she'll answer this when she shows up again!

Wisconsin, zone 5

Wisconsin, zone 5
Badener's picture

(post #15437, reply #4 of 19)

Thanks.  Heard from a Dutch gardener that I should let seed pods ripen longer (until they burst). HIs advice was to let nature take its course - which is no great help since "nature" here (Southern Ontario, Zone 6 at best) means a great deal of indoors for clivias.

Southern Ontario, Z5B
Jeapurrs's picture

(post #15437, reply #5 of 19)

I've never waited for my clivia pods to burst. When they're good and ripe, they'll loose their sheen and go a little dull. The seeds are ripe then and can be harvested. After they've been removed from the pods, they good a good washing with a washrag to remove anything on the outside of the leaves.

As Willem said, they should be planted on the surface of the pot, just sort of mash them in a little so that they have good contact with the soil. Since it's winter, either give them some bottom heat or place them in a very warm location. Never let them dry out but also make sure they aren't soggy either. If you use bagged potting soil, cut it by about 1/3 with perlite to improve drainage.

Don't give up on the ones you have, just give them some heat and they'll probably come to life eventually.


Gardening Savant

Gardening Savant
Badener's picture

(post #15437, reply #6 of 19)

Ah, finally  - details!  Yours are very helpful and I'll proceed accordingly.  Will try the next batch of seeds in the basement light garden, where I start vegetable seeds in March,  and which I watch like a hawk.  I'll report in a year or two about success/failure.

Southern Ontario, Z5B
willem's picture

(post #15437, reply #7 of 19)

When the pods let loose from the stem they are ripe. But I wait till the pod starts bursting open due to the root growth of the seeds.


The Clivia loves compost mixed with sand.



Willem the Hollander,


Gardening 18ft below sealevel (Much better)                                                              


Edited 1/19/2004 3:20:28 AM ET by Willem the Hollander

Willem the Hollander,

Gardening 18ft below sealevel (Much better)                                                              

EricJ's picture

(post #15437, reply #8 of 19)

My Dad has been breeding Clivia in the ways described here for years, he has about 20 of them right now. I just got my first - from him - a yearling, so far it's doing OK.

His advise to me for a happy Clivia is to let them get root bound in the pot. All of his are and he does not re-pot until they get pretty 'dern' big for the pot - and then never to a much bigger pot. All look very happy too. He said he thought they were naturally from rocky areas so this is a normal condition for them. Works well for him!

As for indoors/outdoors - he has them in about 6 months of the year (NY). They get some window light in the winter - very little direct sun, and are put in shady spots in the summer. He says they like heat, but direct sun will burn the leaves when outside.

I like 'em when they bloom... maybe my baby will do so soon...

Best,

Eric J

Badener's picture

(post #15437, reply #9 of 19)

Thanks for the advice about keeping clivia out of full sun; I noticed the burning of leaves, too. 


As to flowering: your yearling will take a while longer!  Clivia is for truly patient folks!

Southern Ontario, Z5B
willem's picture

(post #15437, reply #10 of 19)

About burning of leaves, the clivia originated from Africa. It was named after an English l Lady Charlotte Florentina Clive. Maybe she burned in the bright sunlight. Place them in shaded to semi shaded areas


Willem the Hollander,


Gardening 18ft below sealevel (Much better)                                                              


Edited 1/26/2004 8:28:36 AM ET by Willem the Hollander


Edited 1/26/2004 8:30:28 AM ET by Willem the Hollander

Willem the Hollander,

Gardening 18ft below sealevel (Much better)                                                              

Jeapurrs's picture

(post #15437, reply #11 of 19)

Willem, I've never, ever had one single seed "burst" from a pod due to it sprouting. In fact, I thought that they were probably one of those plants that had to be eaten by an elephant, then excreted, rolled up in "fertilizer" by a dung beetle, buried in a hole with an egg laid on it, a bird looking for dung beetle larvae would find it, gulp it down and "drop" it while it was perched in a tree during a quarter moon. Turns out all they had to do was land on the ground, have the "pod" part rot away and they send out a root, then a leaf.

I got my original Clivia in 1976 and still have it. They like to be rootbound, but more importantly, I think, they'd rather not be divided. They'll certainly put up with it, but they'd just as soon stay right where they are. Don't listen to them. After about five years, even the coarsest potting mix will be broken down to the finest compost. I gave my clivia to my mother when she cooed over it once. She brought it back a couple of years later saying it do anything for her. She had overwatered it, I turned it out of its pot, the potting soil was dust and the roots were almost completely rotted. I saved it, but if she'd waited much longer, it would've died. It's easy to knock the pot off (if the pot doesn't weigh a ton like mine) every year and poke your finger in through the roots and try to pull out some soil. Do this when the plant has gone a while without water so the soil will be dry. If it's pretty fine, it's time to pot up or repot your plant. It's a long affair, so get comfortable on the ground or on a stool or in a chair (I'd recommend on the ground so you don't have to hold the plant or sit on a chair and put it on a table).

If the rootball isn't completely solid, you can massage it firmly and soil will begin falling out. The more soil the falls out, the more easy it is to massage it and the more soil falls out. As the soil begins to fall out the bottom, gently begin to try to work the roots apart. Don't try to untagle the roots, just loosen them to get more soil out and do more massaging. You'll find that the rootball is hollow on the inside. The roots aren't exactly brittle, but they are a little tender and can be broken if handled too roughly. It's not the end of the world if roots get broken, new ones will grow.

If the rootball *is* completely solid, you'll have to use a water hose with an attachment that can blast water into the rootball. Make sure it's a warm day because alot of the water is going to splash off the rootball and onto you at first. Concentrate on one spot, any one spot where you can see soil, and stay there. The bottom is also a good place to start. When you've gotten some soil washed out, try massaging the rootball and loosening the roots so you'll have more access for the water to reach in.

Once you've gotten out all the soil, cut off any dead or rotting roots and any that have been broken, remove from the break, down. Try to loosen the roots as much as you can so the plant won't be going back in as a rootball. If the plant was soild and there was almost no soil in the pot it was in, it's time to move to a little bit bigger pot. If the plant wasn't stuffed with roots or there was a decent amount of soil still in the pot, then put it back in the pot it was in. I like to use a good potting soil and add to it 1 part pine fines to 2 parts potting soil to make sure the soil drains well and doesn't break down quickly. I use a timed release fertilizer in the spring.

I'm currently germinating a large batch of the soft pastel shades. I don't know if I'll be able to stand it, waiting for them to bloom.

Gardening Savant

Gardening Savant
gbandy2's picture

(post #15437, reply #12 of 19)

Jeana, I've been trying to make myself only water my Clivia once a month, but it looks dull and a bit limp and keeps making me anxious.  Also, I keep telling myself that it's my imagination, but I keep thinking that there are more brown areas on the leaves than before.  And I remember you telling me that once there's a brown spot it will be there (forever was it?) a very long time.  She just worries me that Clivia o' mine.


I also keep wondering when it might become more upright and start fanning the leaves out in more than two dimensions/directions.  I guess I need to be patient.


I accidentally knocked one of the seed pods off right before Christmas and stepped on it.  I planted the lone surviving seed in the hydroponics but, as of a few days ago, nothing has come up.  Maybe that "rot" you talked about hasn't occurred.

Jeapurrs's picture

(post #15437, reply #17 of 19)

Gretch, do you still have it in that south window? If you do, it's probably getting too much sun. In the winter, it needs to be in a cool, dim location, watered infrequently (I water mine maybe once in the winter). This is their dormant time and moving them triggers the formation of their bloom buds. They may bloom anyway, but the bloom stalk usually isn't of the same quality. Once you see the buds begin to emerge from the leaves, you can bring it back out and begin watering and feeding it, but always keep it out of direct light. It *will* scorch the leaves and the brown spots are permanent.

Each "fan" will always grow in the same direction. To have a bushy pot, the plant needs to propagate itself with side shoots or short runners. Those will be angled differently and will add more fullness to the pot.

If you didn't peel the yellow, leathery pod coating off of your seed, you need to do that. Then poke your seed into your tray so that half of it is above the soil line. It might be a little cool there to germinate.


Gardening Savant

Gardening Savant
gbandy2's picture

(post #15437, reply #18 of 19)

Thanks for the tips.  I'll move her up to your room tonight.  And check that seed.  I'm sure I didn't peel nothing off of it.

Jeapurrs's picture

(post #15437, reply #19 of 19)

Make it kinda dim in that room and don't put her by a window. No more water till she starts to send up buds or new leaves. That's plural.


Gardening Savant

Gardening Savant
willem's picture

(post #15437, reply #13 of 19)

Well I never had problems with the Clivia. They grow very well in a big pot with good compost. The plant really "eats" the compost.


About the seed pots I just wait till they drop off and the skin starts bursting or cracking. When this happens you are able to see the root pin started pinching thru the tin skin of the seed itself.


Multipying by runners also works very good (the best) and gives better results.


But the fun is growing from seed.


Willem the Hollander,


Gardening 18ft below sealevel (Much better)                                                              

Willem the Hollander,

Gardening 18ft below sealevel (Much better)                                                              

Waud2's picture

(post #15437, reply #14 of 19)

I am now covering my ears!!!!!

I am being tempted now by Clivia seeds........need a source......need a source!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

willem's picture

(post #15437, reply #15 of 19)

Checkin out sources in English.

Coming soon. Hang-on, Don't leave, stay there.

Here are the Mounties to rescue.;)

Willem the Hollander,


Gardening 18ft below sealevel (Much better)                                                              

Willem the Hollander,

Gardening 18ft below sealevel (Much better)                                                              

Waud2's picture

(post #15437, reply #16 of 19)

you are a bad influence!!!!!!!!!