Can I divide butterfly bushes?

Eastlake's picture

I have a large butterfly bush (at least 7 feet tall) that's leaning over, I think probably because I made the mistake of planting it too close to neighboring bushes. I want to move it to a better location and propagate it at the same time. Can I divide it?

Eastlake
Zone 6b (North Central New Jersey)

Eastlake
Zone 6b (North Central New Jersey)

the country gardener's picture

(post #15590, reply #1 of 7)

No, you can't divide it, but they are easy to propogate. In fact, they reseed around here and have been put on the invasives list.

Marty


"The plants have been good to us."  Lester Hawkins

Marty

"The plants have been good to us."  Lester Hawkins

roxanna's picture

(post #15590, reply #2 of 7)

have been put on the invasives list


oh, for heaven's sake, already.  what, might i inquire, are buddleia crowding out in your neck of the woods?  how bad can they be (serious question) in that they are a food plant for the butterflies?  i would think that would be a good reason to welcome their seeding all around. 


on the other hand, your locations is vastly different from mine, i realize.   it just irritates me, however, at some of the things listed as invasives in some places.  sorry for the mini-rant.  i'm much calmer now.   =)

the country gardener's picture

(post #15590, reply #3 of 7)

I think the thing that bugs me is that the people who put together these lists are the same ones who want to ban the use of herbicides which are often the only realistic way to get rid of the invasives. Okay, that's my minirant. Butterfly Bush has naturalized in parts of the Willamette Valley, particularly along the banks of rivers. It does take over native plant habitat. There are some sterile varieties that are okay to plant, but I confess I support getting rid of the species that run amock.

Marty


"The plants have been good to us."  Lester Hawkins

Marty

"The plants have been good to us."  Lester Hawkins

roxanna's picture

(post #15590, reply #4 of 7)

oh, i totally agree about plants that run amock, really i do.  it's just hard to picture buddleia as one of those species, LOL.  here, it's all i can do to keep one alive.  along with roses, another of my frequent failures...


around here, purple loosestrife is rampant in the wetlands, looking gorgeous, but no one seems to do anything about it.  CAN anything be done?  wetlands are protected, which precludes using pesticides, i suppose, but meanwhile the purple tide engulfs everything.  'tis discouraging.


and on a side note, why are garden nurseries even allowed to offer known invasives, such as burning bush euonymous????  just because some uninformed buyer is willing to pay?  ah, yes, the power of the profit margin.  grrrrr.

Astrid's picture

(post #15590, reply #5 of 7)

I have a butterfly bush which was planted 3-4 yrs. ago, and this year it finally has produced...1 bloom! Do some normally take a few years to get to blooming?
This one is supposed to be about 5-6 ft. in size when mature, maybe I should be patient.

New Mexico home organic gardener

Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson

New Mexico home organic gardener Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson
the country gardener's picture

(post #15590, reply #6 of 7)

No. I've seen them bloom first year from previous year cuttings. And seedlings bloom young too; at least they do around here.

Marty


"The plants have been good to us."  Lester Hawkins

Marty

"The plants have been good to us."  Lester Hawkins

drystone's picture

(post #15590, reply #7 of 7)

Buddleia is rampant in many of the cities down south, it springs from any break in the concrete or tarmac.  If you travel through London by train the plant is everywhere.  It can have an adverse effect on buildings if the plant gets a hold and the roots start to expand and bursts the brickwork.


On the subject of invasive species, an invasion of New Zealand flatworm has been traced to garden centres which innocently distribute the pest with potted plants. 


Incidentally we are having a poor year for butterflies over here, by Buddleia has few visitors.


Edited 8/12/2008 5:16 pm ET by drystone