Tree disease..wood boars or is it woo...

Trisha's picture

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I know that this is what my trees have. 3 japanese maples, 2 washington hawthornes, and 2 sugar maples are effected at this point. Any ideas for treatment? There is a product called Lindane that I am running out to buy today. Has anyone else used this product with success? I live in the Midwest and this is a problem killing MANY trees locally.
Trisha

Astrid_Churchill's picture

(post #13693, reply #1 of 13)

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Trisha, try to use something else. Lindane is a very toxic substance, on the red alert list in fact. It has been in use for over 50 years, but that doesn't make it your safest choice. It is volitile, so if sprayed will go into the atmosphere and then return to the ground we know not where, in rain.It doesn't decompose fast either, but remains on the loose for a while.

I would try to find another solution that is environmentally friendly.

Theodora_D.'s picture

(post #13693, reply #2 of 13)

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Trisha,

Astrid is right, you don't want to use a chemical like this until you thoroughly research your problem. You need to know what particular wood borer you are dealing with; there are many individual insects which go by that common name. Then you want to consider what species are being affected, because not all trees will tolerate or respond sucessfully to a given treatment. If you do decide to use ANY spray you need to know at what stage of the insects life cycle the chemical will be effective, and under what meteorological conditions you should spray.

Call your local extension agency, or identify a university extension program in your state and go to their web sites and make phone calls and find out everything you can. If the borers are a significant problem in your area as you say they are, then someone local to you ought to really know their stuff about how to deal with them, and you might want to gather several opinions on treatments, so you get a balanced viewpoint on the possibilities.

I just typed "wood borers" into my search engine, and got an extensive list of sources of info, many of which come from forestry programs or extension agencies on a state by state basis.

Then, let us know what you find out and what you decide to do!

Astrid_Churchill's picture

(post #13693, reply #3 of 13)

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What are the trees symptoms? do you get moths and then larvae? if so it might be best to stop them at the earliest stage, which is probably in the spring.

If you want to learn more about lindane than you want to know, go to www.lindane.com It is commonly used in shampoo to kill headlice, but is falling out of favor because of cases of poisoning and brain damage.

Bill_Flather's picture

(post #13693, reply #4 of 13)

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Yup, wood bores, derned knowitalls. I run into em every time I go down to the lumberyard, I hadn't thought of sprayin em with lindane. Might work. I wouldn't talk to anyone who sprayed me with it.

Bee_Jay's picture

(post #13693, reply #5 of 13)

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And then, there's the wood boars who hog the thread talkin' 'bout wood bores. Sowse 'em with lindane, I say.

BJ

Bee_Jay's picture

(post #13693, reply #6 of 13)

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Trisha, Welcome to sprout Off. This is a problem that you may want to talk to you County Extension Agents about. That's what your tax money pays them for, so don't be shy about asking. At this time of year I don't expect that the borers are active and I'm not sure treatment would work, so you have time to find the best solution.

BJ The Gardeners Husbnd

Trisha's picture

(post #13693, reply #7 of 13)

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I called the local tree surgeon. He came out and is going to talk it over with his dad. I think he is stumped by the fact that there is damage in the hawthorne. I will refrain from using the lindane. I called the tree guy instead. 3 visist yearly for $305, they spray, trim, etc. Since acquiring 8 acres the whole gardening thing has grown to be a little intense. Thank for your help.
Trisha

Tish_Hall's picture

(post #13693, reply #8 of 13)

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Oooo, Trisha,

If you have eight acres and gardening is intense, then PLEASE stay around! The folks here LOVE acreage.

It sounds like the tree guy is a wise investment, if you're working with so much. I've got just a quarter acre and I need a tree guy.

Tish

plantlust_'s picture

(post #13693, reply #9 of 13)

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Another newbie w/acreage!!?!! (wailing and moaning)
Absolutely NOT fair!! (thump, thump, thump)

David_Doud's picture

(post #13693, reply #10 of 13)

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i they spray, trim, etc.

tell us more about what exactly they do - also would like to know about the nature of the damage to the maples and hawthorn - is this something you just noticed? inquiring minds and all that - DOUD

Jeana_'s picture

(post #13693, reply #11 of 13)

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I'm wondering if it's just looking like holes in the trees. Sapsuckers, a type of woodpecker will drill holes in young trees and can girdle them with holes both for the sap and for the insects that the sap attracts. This is really common in dogwoods and young maples. It could be that you just need a tree guy to come out and look at the problem. If that's what it is, hopefully, he'll be upfront and tell you that and save you the cost of spraying and treating for borers. If you have *alot* of holes on a tree and they're mostly in straight lines, then it's a sapsucker. Most borers start down close to the ground and their holes can be hard to find. Sapsuckers can be hard to deter, but at least you won't have to spray any nasty lindane.

Trisha's picture

(post #13693, reply #12 of 13)

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I had no idea i would be envied for acreage. The holes are all throughout the trunk. Tiny little holes 1/8 inch diameter, the bark is flaking off, and the trunk itself appears to be split. I called a customer of mine (I am a chef) he is an urban forester and he will be out on Monday. The general concensus has shifted from boars to maybe the amount of mulch the landscapers used (used landscapers on the trees, they planted 35 3" trunk trees). Out here in Missouri we grow a lot of large rocks, have to use a pick and I don't have enough muscle for the job. Still there has yet to be a determination on the holes. The tree surgeon said that Hawthornes very rarely suffer from boars and if they did it would be an apple boar. Highly unlikely in his opinion. He felt the depth, lack of weeping, and shape of the hole was all wrong. I will let you know what I find out on Monday from the urban forester. I forgot to mention that the trees are all still alive. The tops are in great condition. I don't think this will continue to be the case. I have been noticing this since the early onset of fall, mentioned it to my landscaper and he held onto the wait in see in the spring idea. They are budding but I can't imagine that they are healthy enough to live for any duration of time.

Jeana_'s picture

(post #13693, reply #13 of 13)

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The holes are a little small, but other than that, it really does sound like sapsucker damage. Borers' holes are usually pretty unnoticable unless you have a tree that's young enough that it doesn't have hard bark yet. You might try getting a thing piece of flexible wire and seeing if you can stick it in one of the holes, see how far it goes and see if when it come to the end, when you draw it out, you actually have gooey bug stuff on it. A sapsucker just drills past the bark to get the sap flowing while borers bore through the bark and into the living part of the wood. There, they pupate, then (probably in the spring) they emerge as another type of creature (some borers spend their entire lives in their host tree), mate, lay eggs on their host tree, and the cycle starts over again. I really suggest the wire trick. If it goes in more than a cm, then it's got to be borers.