Cote d'Azur groundcover?

Stray's picture

Hi,


I'm usually over at the Breaktime forum, but have a perennial question...


I'm thinking of buying some of this cote d'Azur perennial groundcover from a local nursury


http://www.millernurseries.com/cart.php?m=product_detail&p=585


but I'm leery of introducing new things without some knowledge other than just a marketing paragraph in a catolog.


I'm in upstate NY (zone 4-5) and have a shade-to-partial-shade spot with some low terraces.  This stuff sounds easy and beautiful.  Are there any downsides? 


It's described as "semi-evergreen" foliage.  I assume that means brown in the winter?


Any info appreciated!


Thanks.


Ithaca, NY  "10 square miles, surrounded by reality"

 

Astrid's picture

(post #8540, reply #1 of 5)

I am slowly getting the knack of perennials, some I've tried did not like NM weather at all, other things do fine. I would give these a try, they seem common enough, with the note that the first year of their growth there will be spaces between plants (they tell you to plant them that way) which doesnt' quite live up to the photo,but have patience and plan for room. Someone here has mentioned before, perennials in their first year just peep, the next year they creep, and the third year they leap. Also the first year and second year they require some attention, go by the information given as to how much light and water they need.

New Mexico home organic gardener

Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson

New Mexico home organic gardener Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson
catjane's picture

(post #8540, reply #2 of 5)

Stray,

I can understand your hesitation. What, exactly, is this plant?! There's no botanical name. My guess is that it might be Aubretia, which is a Mediterranean rock garden plant. Why don't you call Miller Nurseries and ask them? Then you can do a bit of research to find out if it will suit your conditions.

I hate companies that do this. :-(

CJ

Stray's picture

(post #8540, reply #3 of 5)

Good idea.  I'll contact them today.  I was searching the web on the common name, and didn't find much.  I'll report back with what I find.


Thanks


 


Ithaca, NY  "10 square miles, surrounded by reality"

 

Stray's picture

(post #8540, reply #4 of 5)

So they tell me it is Saponaria (ocymoides), also known as Rock Soapwort. 


There's lots of Google hits.  Unfortunatley most of what I've read so far suggests full sun.  Has anyone grown this in partial shade?


Ithaca, NY  "10 square miles, surrounded by reality"

 

Eroomgardener's picture

(post #8540, reply #5 of 5)

I love Saponaria, but ii does best in the full sun. You are doing the right thing doing research before you buy and plant something unfamiliar. Anytime a description says "prefers a full sun site and very good drainage", it is best to do just that-go for what the plant "prefers". Conversely, a plant usually will not do as well when it is planted under the condition where the label says it "tolerates" ________(fill in the blank with whatever condition). You need to look for a good, healthy plant that stays healthy and happy in part shade. Most part shade, and shade, perennial plants that I am familiar with have a limited bloom time, and most bloom in the spring, so you may want to consider plants with attractive foliage. Also, you need to find a plant that matches the moisture level of the area.

Eroomgardener, Zone 6 or 7 depending.

Eroomgardener, Zone 6 or 7 depending.