Cutting back Agapanthus

oldtimer's picture

Does anyone have experience here in the deep south (Florida) with annual cutting back of Agapanthus that is permanently planted in the garden? I'm wondering if Agapanthus benefit from cuttung back in winter or early spring either annually or every few years. Do they benefit from digging and replanting every few years? By the end of the year many of the leaves look ratty and yellow. After a few years in the ground they tend to grow up on top of themselves as the clump enlarges and look like they might need digging, separating and replanting. I understand they flower better the more crowded they are, so is there a middle ground? Should they just be cleaned up or should they be cut back? Periodically dug and re-planted?


Richard

Karen's picture

(post #7922, reply #1 of 5)

I don't think we have too many Florida gardeners here, but I've read that they're best divided after about 3-4 years down there, after they get crowded but before the clumps get too old, as they may recover more slowly.

North Carolina - zone 7

North Carolina - zone 7

oldtimer's picture

(post #7922, reply #2 of 5)

Thanks, Karen, for the input. I tend to agree. I don't see too many gardeners or gardens here. Most homes tend to have a set landscape of evergreens that was installed when the house was built and looks pretty much the same 5 and 10 years later. We never see much color or change. I think most people here come to retire and have no interest in gardens. It's a shame! It's a wonderful, exciting, enriching mind and body experience. How dull this world would be without gardens to delight us.


Richard


 

Karen's picture

(post #7922, reply #3 of 5)

There are gardeners in FL, just not on this particular chat site. Maybe because the Florida gardening experience is so different in soil type (ie sand) and climate. I got the gene from my father, who gardens in St. Pete where I grew up. One of my earliest memories is of his lean-to orchid house up against the garage.

North Carolina - zone 7

North Carolina - zone 7

kmrsy's picture

(post #7922, reply #4 of 5)

Old Timer - I'm on a gardening listserv and one of our members gardens in Florida, I think near Venice.  He's in his 70s and from what he writes and the pictures he sends, I had the impression that everything down there was gardened.  He's always mentioning plants I've never heard of (I'm in Indiana) and something is always blooming.  He posted pictures of what he called autumn colors, just to bait us.  Instead of leaves like us northerners would have expected, they were tropical beauties, orchids, blooming vines, etc.  Here we propagate plants at certain times; in Florida it seems, there's always something new to take a cutting of.  Additionally, he tends to be always visiting some public or private garden, there are so many - and always a plant sale, he always finds something new to take home. 


Kitty


_^..^_
_^..^_ Kitty, neIN, Z5
Florange's picture

(post #7922, reply #5 of 5)

I do!! I do!! I live in FL and garden like a fool! Fortunately, I don't live in a gated community where landscapes are set in stone.  When we built our house, my builder was scandalized when I told him I'd do my own landscaping, thank you!


Regarding the agapanthus, they should be divided in the fall/winter.  They prefer crowded rootzones, so they shouldn't be divided every year, but if they look really crowded and the leaves are awful--I'd do it!  Just make sure to plant the bulbs shallow.  My agapanthus are looking good so I'm doing nothing! 


Ah the challenges of beach sand and salt spray!  I've had more good experiences than bad, and it seems that most, but not all, plants will survive light salt spray.  When I took Master Gardening training, they gave a very short list of plants that would survive a block from the beach.  Boy were they wrong!  Unfortunately, my budget is the thing that stings the most when a newly purchased plant turns pale green when it enters the yard!


Edited 12/20/2005 9:07 pm ET by Florange