coleuslady's picture

February (post #19861)

I've been watching the forum since New Year's, looking for signs of early perennial returns or volunteers in everyone's garden. So I guess I'll jump in and hope that others will add to my humble offering. The snowdrops arrived and were with us all too briefly - a couple of days of snow and sleet ended that visit. Here in the usually mild(ish) mid-Atlantic, we have been seeing daffodil and iris foliage for a while. The deer that have become increasingly invasive are munching the iris leaves, which they usually don't want, but they keep growing anyway. The only bloom right now is in hellebores. They are not my favorite flower, with their nodding habit - I feel like I have to lie on the ground on my back and gaze up into them to see the flower faces. But my neighbor B. has passed along a variety with an upright habit, which also grows in my deepest shade, and the eight plants (all transplanted fine), bigger every year, are blooming now. The stems and flowers are like a yellow-green torch atop darker green lower leaves and make a brave stand in the lower corner of the yard, even viewed from the windows.

In other news, I am satisfying flower-hungry family with vases of those evergreen branches which I can reach or, if lucky, find as windfalls. The hemlocks are a favorite with their tiny cones, but all branches are graceful and fresh and much appreciated during these flowerless months. 

Anybody else?

Elizabeth, Gardening in Zone 7, Mid-Atlantic

“Animals are something invented by plants to move seeds around. An extremely yang solution to a peculiar problem which they faced.” -- Terence McKenna

Antonio_Reis's picture

Hi Elizabeth! It sounds like (post #19861, reply #1 of 5)

Hi Elizabeth! It sounds like you're having a great time in the garden. I can't wait for my hellebores to bloom - -I envy your early start!

kmrsy's picture

Lent (post #19861, reply #2 of 5)

Tomorrow starts Lent, but I haven't checked on my Lenten Rose.  I divided a large clump of Hellebores last fall so there won't be much of a show this year.  Lots of small bulbs ticking there noses out where they don't belong. Really won't be all that long though.

_^..^_ Kitty, neIN, Z5
southernsoil's picture

The daffodils are in full (post #19861, reply #3 of 5)

The daffodils are in full bloom as are the tulips I planted in pots. Forsythia blooms are emerging on the stems with some fully open. The star magnolia is in full bloom with variegated vinca minor blooming at its feet. Several camellia are still blooming and the hyacinth are showing their budded stems. The snow drops are full bloom and lovely. Oh and my walk through our woods revealed the ticks and chiggers have arose too. Happy Valentines Day to you all.

southernsoil's picture

Today will be spent weeding (post #19861, reply #4 of 5)

Today will be spent weeding the driveway gardens of Hairy vetch. One side of the drive is done now for the other side. 300 feet of ugh...What are you doing today in the garden?

coleuslady's picture

Potted bulbs (post #19861, reply #5 of 5)

Southernsoil, I do not envy you the vetch! Around here, we were initially fooled by the stage when vetch looks cute - but you certainly pay for that foolishness, don't you? It's too cold right now to do anything out of doors, but your mention of potted tulips brings me to one pot of daffodils on the front porch. Last spring someone was selling irises from her yard as a church fundraiser. While I was looking around, her elderly mother pulled me aside and told me, "I'm selling my daffodil bulbs, a dozen for $2.00!" Who could resist an old lady's daffodils, especially when she was underselling her offspring?! Of course, I bought them (along with an iris). I shared a few bulbs with a neighbor and wanted to share more but couldn't get any takers on the rest. Then it was too late to plant them, as everything had gone dormant; I didn't know exactly where anything was and didn't want to risk digging up perennials. So they went into a pot, which I placed on the front step, hoping the squirrels would leave it alone (which they mostly have). The foliage is growing, as is that of the yard daffodils, and all are showing signs of buds within. It works a treat: with so little happening in the yards now, everyone who crosses the porch points to the pot of emerging leaves and exclaims "Oh!" Hope your plants are weathering the cold snap!

Elizabeth, Gardening in Zone 7, Mid-Atlantic

“Animals are something invented by plants to move seeds around. An extremely yang solution to a peculiar problem which they faced.” -- Terence McKenna