climbing tomato varieties

Lana's picture

could someone give me names of climbing tomato varieties. i was reading some of the archives and this was mentioned. i would like to have some toms climbing at the entrance to my kitchen garden.

jeana's picture

(post #12564, reply #1 of 11)

If you look at catalogs or look at websites, anything listed as an "indeterminate" is a climb tomato. "Determinates" are ones that only grow to a certain size than stop growing. ID's don't ever stop growing.

In general, cherry or small types are very good growers and make healthy, robust plants.

Jeana

Never try to baptize a cat.

Jeana Never try to baptize a cat.
Astrid's picture

(post #12564, reply #2 of 11)

If you have all the room in the world, try Red or Yellow currant tomatoes. They are fun, small tomatoes about the size of a dime which produce in huge clusters. The biggest plant I have had took up about 6-8 feet in length and 3 ft. in width by the end of the summer, draped over a row of chicken wire. That sums up the the reason they are called indeterminate! Both are well flavored and fun to use in salads, or even sliced for sandwiches.

For a smaller tomato plant, Riesentraube makes clusters of 20-40 plum shaped fruits about small thumb size. This one is going out of style and seeds are hard to find.

The best place, in my opinion, to find a wide selection of tomato seeds as well as other garden seeds, some unusual, and all at a very good price, is at Pinetree Seeds in Maine. They have a website.

www.superseeds.com

New Mexico home organic gardener

Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson


Edited 2/7/2009 1:07 pm by Astrid

New Mexico home organic gardener Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson
Abbie's picture

(post #12564, reply #3 of 11)

I ordered from Pinetree Gardens this year as usual but the seeds, which generally arrive in a few weeks at most have still not come. I e-mailed to ask if there was a problem and got a quick reply that they have been EXTREMELY busy this year but that the seeds are coming.

I had heard that seed companies are getting more business now that the economy has gone south or sour if you prefer, and I'm glad to hear that they are so busy because they are a very reliable seed source.

Northern Virginia, Zone 7A.

Northern Virginia, Zone 7A.

Astrid's picture

(post #12564, reply #4 of 11)

Yup, I'm still waiting to get my Pinetree order too. I finally remembered that they do take a while to deliver. Glad to hear they are working as fast as they can.
I plan to plant some seeds I have on hand in the next few days, peas and spinach. An article in the latest Organic Gardening magazine talked about forking the garden, then making furrows for seeds, and then watering. The idea being that the soil will be wet when the seeds are planted, doing things in that order. I have always planted and then watered, so this is going to be interesting.

New Mexico home organic gardener

Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson

Edited 2/28/2009 6:51 pm by Astrid


Edited 2/28/2009 6:55 pm by Astrid

New Mexico home organic gardener Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson
Abbie's picture

(post #12564, reply #5 of 11)

"I have always planted and then watered, so this is going to be interesting."

So have I. In checking Nancy Bubel on a seed I was trying, she mentioned that a gent who grew thyme commercially put the seeds in a furrow and then let the watering do the job of covering the seeds, so I guess we've got opportunities both ways. For now, I'm just trying to get things going under fluorescents so they'll be ready in late April or early May.

Northern Virginia, Zone 7A.

Northern Virginia, Zone 7A.

Astrid's picture

(post #12564, reply #6 of 11)

I'm still trying to figure out just when to plant here in New Mexico. We haven't had a frost since about a month ago, and the surface soil, including the compost I added, is warm to the touch for about an inch. I'm hoping spinach and peas will take to this well. I will need to watch the moisture in the deeper soil levels and water consistently for new roots.

New Mexico home organic gardener

Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson

New Mexico home organic gardener Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson
Ruth's picture

(post #12564, reply #7 of 11)

My seed orders (from Fedco and Totally Tomatoes) took what seemed like eons to arrive (over a month). That's way longer than last year. With the Fedco order came a letter saying that sales were at an all-time high. So be patient.

emmie's picture

(post #12564, reply #8 of 11)

Hi-just wanted to say when I plant green beans, I always make the row, then let the hose run in it so it's good and wet. Then lay the bean seeds in the row. To cover them I use old potting soil from my containers. I save it in a 32 gal garbage can. If I plant by the moon, they are usually up in 3 days.

Astrid's picture

(post #12564, reply #9 of 11)

I'm going to watch the progress of plants this year, using a well watered area to plant in, rather than watering after planting. No sign of peas or spinach seedlings yet, it has been an "average" spring here in NM so far, snow one day, next day temps. in the 50's +.

New Mexico home organic gardener

Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson

New Mexico home organic gardener Adopt the pace of nature; her secret is patience. Emerson
AbbyZone6's picture

(post #12564, reply #10 of 11)

In Maryland, I grew 'Gardener's Delight', they grew to be over 16 feet long and a heavy producer. I was very happy with this variety.
This year I am trying 'Super Sweet 100' in Connecticut. I am fairly confident they will be as successful.
I tried growing some of the unusual color and/or shapes of climbing toms, and it didn't compare to the 'Gardener's Delight'.
Remember tomato plants get heavy, so make sure you have good support.

Lana's picture

(post #12564, reply #11 of 11)

thank you.  i thought i would try "triple crop".  i "cannot" order any more seed. lol. i will have to try gardener's delight next year.   thank you again.